Funded Activities

The Department of Health funds a range of activities through the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme managed by the Indigenous Health Division (IHD).

Page last updated: 04 July 2019

Current Funding activities


Indigenous Australians' Health Programme - Tackling Indigenous Smoking (TIS)

The Australian Government is committed to reducing the high rate of smoking amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Under the National Healthcare Agreement, the Council of Australian Governments has committed to halving the daily smoking rate among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults (aged 18 years or older) from the 2008 rate of 47.7%,1 by 2018.

The Tackling Indigenous Smoking programme is a targeted activity funded by the Australian Government under the Indigenous Australian's Health Programme to reduce smoking rates among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The programme includes grant funding for regional tobacco control activities.

Word version: Grant Activity Guidelines—Tackling Indigenous Smoking (Word 614 KB)
PDF version: Grant Activity Guidelines—Tackling Indigenous Smoking (PDF 281 KB)


Primary Health Care Activity

The Primary Health Care Activity (PHC Activity) is a component of the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme (IAHP), which aims to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have access to effective health care services in urban, regional, rural and remote locations across the nation. The PHC Activity provides grant funding to a range of organisations including Aboriginal community controlled health organisations (ACCHOs), to support and deliver comprehensive, culturally appropriate primary health care services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and provide system-level support to the Indigenous primary health care sector.

Word version: Grant Programme Guidelines—Primary Health Care Activity (Word 87 KB)
PDF version: Grant Programme Guidelines—Primary Health Care Activity (PDF 181 KB)


Remote Area Health Corps (RAHC)

The objective of the RAHC program is to address critical short-term workforce shortages in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory by recruiting urban-based health professionals for short-term deployments of between three and 12 weeks. The health professionals work in remote Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations and Northern Territory (NT) Government-managed clinics in the NT. A range of health professionals are recruited including general practitioners, registered nurses, and ear health and oral health professionals. The RAHC program provides health professionals with development and training as well as appropriate cultural orientation to fill more than 700 short-term placements per year.


Integrated Team Care (ITC)

The aims of the ITC Activity are to:

  • contribute to improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic health conditions through access to care coordination, multidisciplinary care, and support for self-management; and
  • improve access to culturally appropriate mainstream primary care services (including but not limited to general practice, allied health and specialists) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

ITC is provided by a team/teams of Indigenous Health Project Officers (IHPOs), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Outreach Workers (Outreach Workers) and Care Coordinators. The team works in their region to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to obtain primary health care as required, provide care coordination services to eligible Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic disease/s who require coordinated, multidisciplinary care, and improve access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to culturally appropriate mainstream primary care.

Care Coordinators have access to the Supplementary Services funding pool for when they need to expedite a patient’s access to an urgent and essential allied health or specialist service (including certain approved medical aids), where the services are not otherwise available in a clinically acceptable timeframe. Supplementary Services can be used to fund the necessary local transport to access the service, where not publicly available.

ITC is funded under the Indigenous Australians’ Health Programme and is administered by Primary Health Networks.

More information about ITC is available in the ITC Program Implementation Guidelines below.

ITC Program Implementation Guidelines

Word version: ITC Program Implementation Guidelines - 2018-19 to 2020-21 (Word 133 KB)
PDF version: ITC Program Implementation Guidelines - 2018-19 to 2020-21 (PDF 1006 KB)

ITC Program Review

The Department of Health commissioned Health Policy Analysis in 2017 to review care coordination as part of the ITC Program. The review examined whether the program was meetings its aims and objectives of improving the health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with a chronic disease through better access to care coordination and multidisciplinary care.

The review found that care coordination played an integral role in improving the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic disease through improved access to services and coordinated care.

More information is provided in the Review Summary Report below.

Word version: ITC Program Review Summary Report (Word 1160 KB)
PDF version: ITC Program Review Summary Report (PDF 346 KB)

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